Monday, January 4, 2010

CCBER Conservation and Restoration Ecology seminar series

CCBER's Monday night seminar series will be located in room 2124 Girvetz Hall due to impacts associated with our NSF-funded renovation of our herbarium.
The topic and speakers are described below. We look forward to seeing you there. Monday nights 6-7pm.


Conservation and Restoration Ecology Seminar

Winter 2010

Conservation & Restoration Response to Global Climate Change Predictions

Lisa Stratton – stratton@lifesci.ucsb.edu

Room 2124 Girvetz

Jan. 4. – Introduction & Discussion

Jan 11. – Biodiversity Conservation in an age of climate change: the case of the Southern California Bight by: Michael V. McGinnis, PhD
Acting Director, Ocean and Coastal Policy Center, Marine Science Institute & Lecturer, Environmental Studies Program & Graduate School of Environmental Science and Management

January 18 – Holiday

January 25 – Class presentations/Discussion: Science of Global Climate Change


February 1 – Gaia theory and climate change, by: Lee Klinger – Independent Scientist

February 8 – Understanding the impacts to Global Climate Change on Plant Phenology and Pollination Patterns – Brian Haggerty, UCSB

February 15th – Holiday


February 22 – State of California and the Coastal Conservancy Policy Response to Global Climate Change Predictions – Bob Thiel, Project Manager, State Coastal Conservancy

March 1 – Global Climate Change and the Southern California Steelhead Recovery Plan – Mark Capelli, Recovery Coordinator, NOAA Fisheries Service

March 8 – Final Discussion

1 comment:

Josh Cohen said...

The room might switch as there is no projector installed there.

I highly recommend this series. This will be the 3rd one I've taken. Each quarter has a different topic. It's a great way to learn about something new or more about something you are already interested in. Most of the speakers are fantastic and real experts in their field.

You can drop in on any seminar that sounds interesting or you can consider enrolling in the class. The workload is light and the quality and information is excellent.